GRANTEES OF THE LIA FUND: 2013

CLIMATE SOLUTIONS

350.org's Global Power Shift is aimed at launching a new wave of climate campaigns, through training activists around the world to tell climate stories, mobilize individuals and organizations, lead protests, and generate public pressure for action. ($15,000)

Amazon Watch is dedicated to protecting the rain forest and advancing the rights of indigenous peoples in the Amazon Basin, by providing capacity building to indigenous communities to reinforce their ability to advocate, through audiovisual documentation, legal rights, and media. ($15,000)

Asian PacificEnvironmental Network aims to create clean and healthy environments for marginalized California communities, by building leadership and power among Asian/Pacific Islander immigrants and refugees and bringing green energy and green jobs to local communities. ($20,000)

Bay Localize conceived the Bay Area 2020 program to help the region adapt to climate change, reduce greenhouse gases, and make the economic transition away from fossil fuels. Supported projects include revision of the Community Resilience Toolkit. ($20,000 for Year 3 of a $60,000 3-year grant)

Black Mesa Water Coalition/Native Movement addresses issues of water depletion, natural resource exploitation, and the degradation of health in the Navajo and Hopi communities caused by the fossil-fuel economy that has polluted air, land, and water; and replacing it with green economic development. ($10,000)

Blue Climate Solutions promotes marine conservation (“blue carbon”) as a major part of the solution to climate change. This grant supports the Blue Climate Coalition, an international partnership for marine conservation, and for advancing blue-carbon policy. ($25,000 for Year 3 of a $75,000 3-year grant)

Chesapeake Climate Action Network’s Cap and Dividend campaign is aimed at promoting a national dialogue on the cap-and-dividend concept, supported by educational materials. ($25,000 for Year 3 of a $75,000 3-year grant)

Climate Communication is devoted to promoting the latest and best climate science to scientists, the public, the media, organizations, and policymakers, through personal contacts with members of the media, and with presentations and training for science agencies on framing the message. ($20,000)

Conversations with the Earth Book Project is creating multimedia stories about the impact of climate change on indigenous peoples and how they are adapting. These stories will be disseminated around the world, to remote communities, to museums, and to websites such as National Geographic’s Newswatch. ($20,000)

Earthworks’ Oil & Gas Accountability Project supported a rally and march in Austin, Texas, in March 2013, following the Frack Attack National Summit in Dallas, to pressure Texas officials to protect public health and safety from the dangers of fracking, and demand accountability from the oil and gas industry. ($5,000)

Environmental Investigation Agency’s Illegal Logging Project fights illegal logging, which destroys habitats and causes deforestation. EIA works to change businesses’ wood sourcing practices and enforce the U.S. Lacey Act ban on illegally sourced wood products. ($25,000 for Year 3 of a $75,000 3-year grant)

Environmental Investigation Agency’s Indigenous Peoples and REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) Program promotes better forest governance by applying lessons about demand-side drivers of deforestation and encouraging indigenous people’s engagement in REDD policy and practice. ($10,000)

Friends of the Earth has launched a REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) project in California to safeguard lands of indigenous peoples, by engaging with policymakers, using financial-market campaigns to change corporate behavior, and promoting wise forest governance. ($15,000)

Indigenous Environmental Network, formed by grassroots indigenous peoples, addresses environmental and economic justice issues and builds the capacity of Indigenous communities to protect sacred sites, natural resources, and health, and to build economically sustainable communities. ($15,000)

Marin Carbon Project, in conjunction with UC-Berkeley’s Ecosystem Sciences Division, is exploring the potential for carbon sequestration in rangeland soils to combat climate change, including comparing the footprint of grass-fed beef cattle to feedlot beef production. ($25,000 for Year 3 of a $75,000 3-year grant)

Oil Change International focuses on exposing the true costs of fossil fuels and facilitating the transition to clean energy, by refuting industry arguments for oil, gas, and coal development; engaging in policy forums; and organizing resistance to the political influence of the fossil-fuel industry. ($20,000)

Project Survival Media is a global youth journalism network dedicated to encouraging dialogue and broadcasting stories of survival and ingenuity by people fighting the impact of climate change, especially those underrepresented in mainstream media. ($13,600)

The Turtle is a project of UC Berkeley’s Laboratory of Microbial Ecology to develop a handheld, inexpensive DNA-based device called The Turtle, which “reads” its environment for such microbes as pollen or contaminating genes that could affect marginalized communities. ($5,000)

United Roots/Green Youth Arts and Media Center addresses the root issues of violence by providing disenfranchised youth the chance to engage with the green economy, performing arts, and digital media in ways that educate, empower, inspire, and transform their lives. ($10,000)

Youth Speaks encourages young people to embrace the pen and the microphone for positive creative expression, through writing and performing spoken word, poetry, and theater. It empowers the next generation of leaders to use their voices for social change, including environmental change. ($10,000)



COMMUNITY ARTS

African American Art & Culture Complex strives for cross-cultural understanding through celebrating the African and African American cultural experience, and supports the work of young Bay Area artists, including an arts and green education program for children and at-risk teens. ($10,000)

Cornerstone Theater Company is a multi-ethnic ensemble that commissions and produces plays that pair professional artists with non-artists to bridge diverse communities. Its current project is The Hunger Cycle, exploring food and hunger issues in the Los Angeles area. ($11,000)

Cultural Odyssey’s The Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women utilizes theater, movement, literature, and visual art to increase female inmates’ self- and social awareness. The project is aimed at reducing recidivism and now also includes women who are HIV positive. ($10,000)

Destiny Arts exists to end isolation, prejudice, and violence in the lives of young people through its violence-prevention and conflict-resolution programs, an award-winning performance company, and a highly decorated martial-arts program and tournament team. ($10,000)

East Bay Center for the Performing Arts uses a cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary approach to help youth discover their creative gifts and engage in social justice issues through original music, film, theater, dance, and community projects. ($10,000)

Eastside Arts Alliance is an organization of artists, cultural workers, and community organizers of color in Oakland’s San Antonio district who unite art with activism to bridge ethnically divided communities and foster social change. ($12,500)

Eco-Logical Art Inc. re-envisions art by creating it from recycled materials and displaying it where ordinary people can enjoy it. This grant supports Project ReStore, a youth street mural program for blighted neighborhoods and vacant storefronts. ($10,000)

The Hannah Project is expanding the Hannah Gallery into an education and arts center to build a culture of educational achievement and pride for youth and families of Marin City, California. Programs include Second Friday Jazz, gospel music and praise dancing, spoken word, and art classes and exhibits. ($15,000)

Kularts is dedicated to expanding understanding of American Pilipino culture and preserving ancient Pilipino art forms as a way of bringing the community together. Its Eco Arts program for San Francisco youth focuses on the interconnection of environment and cultural identity. ($10,000)

L.A. Goal helps adults with developmental disabilities achieve their highest level of independence and employability, through art, music, and drama classes; paid, part-time employment for student artists; and exhibits of student work to build bridges to the wider community. ($15,000)

La Peña Cultural Center is a vibrant community cultural center with a global vision that promotes peace, social justice, and cultural understanding through the arts, education, and social action. It is expanding its reach by incorporating nearby elementary and middle schools into its programming. ($12,500)

Las Fotos Project fosters positive change for at-risk Latina youth in northeast Los Angeles County who face great adversity in their daily lives. Through photography, creative writing, and mentorship, they can develop confidence and cultural pride that transfers to their everyday lives. ($15,000)

Los Angeles Poverty Department is a theater company that aims to change perception of Los Angeles’ Skid Row. Its performance project “Biggest Recovery Community Anywhere” -- chronicles how thousands of personal transformations led to neighborhood transformation. ($11,000)

Los Cenzontles Mexican Arts Center is a model for grassroots arts programs and advocacy for the Mexican American voice. Its arts academy, in a low-income immigrant community in San Pablo, California, is tailored to those in cultural transition, with a mix of folk and vernacular art and music classes. ($15,000)

MA’AT Matters’ project called Stories of Reclamation and Resiliency engages homeless families in shelters, youth and adults in the criminal justice system, and youth aging out of foster care, in art and performance to give creative voice to their stories of tribulations and triumphs. ($10,000)

Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore supports the regeneration and creative life of the northeast San Fernando Valley community, with workshops in music, dance, theater, writing, puppetry, and visual arts; an annual literacy and arts festival; and other multi-arts, multi-ethnic, and multimedia events. ($7,500)

United Roots Oakland/Green Youth Arts and Media Center addresses the root issues of violence by providing disenfranchised youth the chance to engage with the green economy, performing arts, and digital media in ways that educate, empower, inspire, and transform their lives. ($10,000)

The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company conducts intensive theater residencies to empower youth in at-risk environments to discover their creative voice, nurture their desire for literacy, build self-respect, practice nonviolence, and set previously inconceivable expectations for themselves. ($10,000)

Youth Speaks encourages young people to embrace the pen and the microphone as an outlet for positive creative expression, through writing and performing spoken word, poetry and theater. It aims to empower the next generation of leaders to apply their voices as creators of social change. ($12,000)

 

 

HOLISTIC HEALTH & HEALING

Academic Consortium for Complementary and Alternative Health Care (ACCAHC) seeks to enhance patient care by supporting integrated environments for licensed complementary and alternative healthcare disciplines and by influencing national policy through its new core project, the Center for Optimal Integration. ($30,000)

California Oncology Research Institute (CORI) and The Wellness Community – West Los Angeles bring cancer information, support, and screening to primarily African-American and Latino underserved neighborhoods of Los Angeles County to reach people at high risk for cancer and to save lives through early detection. ($23,000)

Charlotte Maxwell Complementary Clinic provides free access to alternative, complementary treatments to underserved women with cancer, including acupuncture, Chinese and Western herbs, massage therapy, homeopathy, and therapeutic imagery, along with social services. ($30,000)

Commonweal works to grow, strengthen, and sustain the intersection of art and healing by promoting access to healing resources, sharing knowledge and experience, and using art as a source of transformation. This grant funded scholarships to the Cancer Help Program. ($20,000)

East Point Peace Academy addresses the root causes of violence by creating sustainable change in the culture and values that romanticize violence. PPWN teaches conflict-resolution skills based on the Kingian Nonviolence model to effect change in the individual, organizations, and the community. ($10,000)

Farmer Veteran Coalition reaches out to male and female military veterans to connect them with careers in agriculture, both rural and urban. FVC collaborates with other organizations to provide outreach, community building, training, and help with marketing veteran-produced crops and food products. ($10,000)

Freedom to Choose teaches those in prison, parolees, and recovering drug addicts how to reduce conflict, take personal responsibility, make better choices, and forgive themselves. This grant funds training for an Inmate Mentor Self-Help Group at a women’s prison in Chowchilla, California. ($10,000)

Ground Operations, a documentary produced by From the Heart Productions, spearheads a social action campaign on how sustainable farming and ranching dovetail with the needs of returning veterans, utilizing their work ethic and skills at a time that America needs new farmers and more organic agriculture. ($10,000)

Homes on the Range is a Media Policy Center documentary detailing what community collaboration in Sheridan, Wyoming, accomplished, building four green eldercare houses, with a total of 50 rooms, with the help of a medical entity as its core. This grant went to filming the final scenes showcasing the warmth and homeliness of such settings. ($10,000)

MBA Project, Inc. delivers mindfulness-based healing-arts services to at-risk, gang-involved, and incarcerated youth in four Bay Area counties, giving them concrete tools to reduce stress, impulsivity, and violent behavior and increase self-esteem, self-regulation, and well-being. ($20,000)

Oakland Food Connection seeks to create a socially just food system in East Oakland by building gardens with community groups, providing ecological and nutrition education, and teaching youth to grow, prepare, and sell pesticide-free food at affordable prices. ($20,000)

Occidental Arts & Ecology Center is an education center and organic farm in Sonoma County that aims to create ecologically, economically, and culturally sustainable communities, including training and consultation on school garden programs. ($20,000)

Threshold Choir is a network of a cappella choirs whose mission is to sing for and with people who are dying. This grant goes for leadership training for new directors in the skills needed for bedside singing to provide comfort to those who are at the threshold of life. ($10,000)

Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore supports the regeneration and creative life of the northeast San Fernando Valley community with workshops in music, dance, theater, writing, puppetry, and visual arts; an annual literacy and arts festival; and other multi-arts, multi-ethnic, and multimedia events. ($7,500)

The Turtle is a project of UC Berkeley’s Laboratory of Microbial Ecology to develop a handheld, inexpensive DNA-based device called The Turtle, which “reads” its environment for such microbes as pollen or contaminating genes that could affect marginalized communities. ($5,000)

Western Gate Roots & Wings Foundation provides educational programming and mentors in schools and correctional facilities by drawing on Native American traditions, ceremonies, and Elder Wisdom to promote healing and provide support for youth struggling with gangs, violence, and drugs. ($10,000)

Women’s HIV Program at UCSF convened a national conversation in August 2013 in Washington, DC, about the history of violence and trauma of many women with HIV, how it affects their medical and psychological outcomes, and the healing that the Medea Project has accomplished with these women. ($7,500)

Zen Hospice Project brings mindful, compassionate care to the dying, to their caregivers, and to the bereaved, through direct care, education, and inspirational support, in the Bay Area. ZHP serves an ethnically diverse population in the community and in residential care at the Guest House. ($10,000)